Our manufactory sectors continue to grow here in Berkeley County, SC .

Mercedes supplier to open Berkeley County operation

Staff Report

Dec 21, 2017

 Mercedes-Benz Vans’ expanding campus in Ladson has attracted another automotive supplier to the Lowcountry.

Thermo King, a producer of refrigeration and temperature-control systems for the automotive and trucking industries, said it will open a manufacturing operation in Berkeley County. The company did not disclose the address.

The manufacturer will supply heavy-duty mobile air conditioning solutions for Mercedes’ new Sprinter van model. Mercedes’ $500 million expansion, which kicked off in 2015, is on schedule to roll off the first new vans by 2020.

Thermo King plans to invest $2.6 million and hire 25 people for its new operation, according to a news release. This is the fourth S.C. location for the company; it also operates in Columbia, Florence and Myrtle Beach.

“We are excited to expand our business in the dynamic Charleston market,” Ritchie McQueeney, president of Thermo King Charleston, said in the release. “The new Thermo King of Charleston facility will allow our company to support our clients, improve delivery and optimize custom options in the ever-changing transport temperature control and automotive industries.”

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Owners Rush to Prepay Property Taxes Before Losing Benefits

Owners Rush to Prepay Property Taxes Before Losing Benefits

With tax reform signed into law, homeowners in areas with high property taxes are scrambling to prepay their 2018 tax bill in order to take advantage of deductions that will be severely curtailed once the legislation takes effect Jan. 1. The new tax law, which Congress passed and President Donald Trump signed last week, caps the amount of state, local, and property taxes that homeowners can deduct at $10,000.

Some counties already allow for prepayment of taxes, while others are rushing to provide residents the ability to do so after strong demand. For example, local officials in Montgomery County, Md., say they’re fielding requests to prepay taxes for the first time ever, which prompted them to hold a special meeting the day after Christmas to come up with a plan.

“It just never came up [before],” George Leventhal, a Montgomery County councilman, told CNNMoney. “No one was saying, ‘Please let me make early payment of a bill I don’t owe yet.’ Wise cash management suggests you should pay closer to the due date, not farther away. But because of this change, it seems it could be possible that people could derive some benefit and deduct their property taxes for next year in 2017.”

Nearly half of the county’s taxpayers have more than $10,000 in combined state and local taxes, Leventhal says.

Still, there’s no guarantee homeowners who prepay their 2018 property taxes will be able to deduct the payment. On Wednesday, the IRS posted to its website an advisory notice that said prepaying property taxes will work only under limited circumstances. To qualify for the deduction, property taxes will need to be paid in 2017—but they also must be assessed in 2017. That means homeowners who prepaid their taxes based on estimated assessments or who tried to pay several years’ worth of taxes at once will likely still face the new limited deductions, The New York Times reports.

Source: “Homeowners Scramble to Pre-Pay Property Taxes,” CNNMoney (Dec. 27, 2017) and “Prepaying Your Property Tax? IRS Cautions It Might Not Pay Off,” The New York Times (Dec. 27, 2017)

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6 Features for Home Entertaining

6 Features a Home Needs for Entertaining

Buyers looking for a home that’s perfect for entertaining will want certain property details. HomeDesignFind.com recently profiled some characteristics of the perfect home for entertaining, including:

An entry hall or foyer. Make sure it’s sizable enough to allow guests to enter comfortably and to remove their coats and shoes. In addition, a covered front porch that protects visitors from the rain may be a perk.

A coat closet in the entryway. Where to store partygoers’ coats is a common dilemma for hosts. Buyers may want to check whether a coat closet is available near the entry.

Open floor concept. This kind of floor plan can offer the flexibility to create seating arrangements in a variety of ways and can also be easier for guests to mix and mingle throughout the party. An island between the kitchen and dining room offers more seating and a place to serve a buffet.

A walk-in pantry. HomeDesignFind.com says this one is less obvious, but having a walk-in pantry can be a great spot to store extra ingredients and platters.

A powder room on the first floor. Guests will need to use the bathroom, so having one on the first floor near the entry may be ideal.

Indoor-outdoor flow. A sliding glass door that gives you access to a patio or garden is a nice perk when entertaining in the warmer months. It allows people to step inside and outside, while continuing to feel part of the festivities.

Source: “Design Dilemma: Shopping for a Home for Entertaining,” HomeDesignFind.com (December 2017)

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Black Accents Make Comeback in Home Design

Black Accents Make Comeback in Home Design

Photo credit: KitchenAid

Black is making a comeback in home design, with black fixtures, appliances, and furniture emerging as hot trends for the new year. Ryan Brown of Brown Design Group in Southern California predicts that black fixtures will replace brass as the most trendy home hardware in 2018. “They look great in modern applications, as well as transitional homes,” he told realtor.com®. “And the best part is no water spots to clean off.”

Read more: The New Kitchen Finish: Black Stainless

Matted black furniture also will gain popularity in 2018, says Amy Chernoff, vice president of marketing for AJ Madison, an appliance and fixture retailer. Black goes with anything, and in matte finishes, it’s easier to clean than lighter, polished metals. Also, Chernoff predicts that black stainless appliances—an alternative to the shiny finish of stainless steel—likely will become trendier in the new year. “The smudge-resistant, minimal and sleek look was in line with 2017 kitchen trends,” Chernoff told Kitchen & Bath Design News.

Source: “The 9 Hottest Interior Design and Décor Trends You’ll See in 2018,” realtor.com® (Dec. 27, 2017) and “Year-End Look and New Trends for 2018,” Kitchen & Bath Design News (December 2017)

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A Place to Call Home!!

Yes we are smiling and very excited. Why? It is beginning to look like this family will be spending Christmas 2017 in their new home. Now the big decision is where to place the XMAS Tree??

Posted by Brenda Walker Real Estate Consultant on Sunday, November 5, 2017

Yes we are smiling and very excited. Why? It is beginning to look like this family will be spending Christmas 2017 in their new home. Now the big decision is where to place the XMAS Tree??

Congratulations’ to the Fernandez Family a New Home, New Adventure and New Memories. May all the Joys of Christmas fill your Heart throughout the New Year.

Posted by Brenda Walker Real Estate Consultant on Monday, December 25, 2017

 

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Yes, a new home for the Doggies.

We are happy dogs in a car. We are too excited to lie down and nap. We’re on our way, hurrah. Happy thoughts run through our mind as we stare and wag at our New House. We are happy dogs in a car. We have a big fenced in back yard. Now please open the door so we can play as happy dogs forever more. Welcome home Elvis, Dixie and Hannibal.

Posted by Brenda Walker Real Estate Consultant on Wednesday, October 18, 2017

We are happy dogs in a car. We are too excited to lie down and nap. We’re on our way, hurrah. Happy thoughts run through our mind as we stare and wag at our New House. We are happy dogs in a car. We have a big fenced in back yard. Now please open the door so we can play as happy dogs forever more. Welcome home Elvis, Dixie and Hannibal.

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Behavior Advice: Helping Your Dog Adjust to a New Home

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Behavior Advice: Helping Your Dog Adjust to a New Home
Tips on easing the stress of moving
Moving is hard on everybody

Move is a four-letter word. (So is “pack” by the way, but that whole issue is subsumed within the horror of the move.) It’s not just you who hates moving—everybody does. The misery associated with it affects our dogs, too. There’s no way you can avoid some of the unpleasantness of moving, but there are ways that you can ease your dog’s transition to a new home.

Keep old routines. All of the changes associated with moves are inherently stressful, so do what you can to keep some things the same. If you can maintain the same general routine as before, that is helpful to dogs. So, if your dog is used to getting up, going into the yard, eating breakfast and then going on a walk, try to follow that same pattern in the new place. If you have to change things up because of a new job or other commitments, try to keep as much of the old routine in place as possible for at least a couple of weeks. Once your dog has settled in, additional changes will be easier to handle.

Don’t buy new gear right now. It is natural to want to buy new stuff when you move to a new place. For your dog’s sake, confine those urges to your own gear—towels, furniture, trash cans etc.—and leave his stuff alone for at least a few weeks until he is used to the place. Yes, I know it’s discouraging to bring a nasty, fur-covered old dog bed and water bowls with dings in them into your new home, but those things are comforting to your dog, so don’t take them away. If your urge to buy new things for your dog is overwhelming, indulge it with new toys or things to chew on, but resist the temptation to replace his regular gear for now.

Lots of loving. Giving your dog lots of attention and spending time with him playing, walking and just being together sounds simple. After all, that’s what you normally do, right? The problem is that when you move, you can become overwhelmed with so many details to attend to and all the work that has to be done. Of course, you never think you are someone who would ignore your dog or skip his walk, but a move can make anything possible. It’s unrealistic to think that you will be able to do as much for your dog as you could if you weren’t moving, but commit to spending quality time with him every day and that will help him out a lot.

Leave treats, stuffed Kongs and familiar things when you depart. Even dogs who have been perfectly comfortable for years being left alone when you leave may struggle in a new home. Most dogs are extremely place sensitive and need to learn to be okay when left alone at the new house. Try to wait as long as you can before leaving your dog alone at the new house, even if that means awkwardly taking him everywhere for a few days or so. If you’re moving with other family members, one option is to take turns staying home with him for those first few days so that at least one of you is always with him. When you do have to leave him, start with short departures if you can. Always leave him with something he loves such as a Kong stuffed with treats or something new (and safe even without supervision!) to chew on. If he has his usual dog bed, crate or blanket that he knows from the old house, these may comfort him.

Spend time on the floor with your dog. One of the things that helps dogs to feel at home someplace new is familiar smells. You can add those familiar smells to your house faster by spending time on the floor with your dog. Being on the floor together also adds to the time you spend giving him the loving that he needs during this stressful time.

Be patient. This may be the most obvious advice of all, but being patient and letting dogs adjust at their own speed is wise. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, many take a few weeks to settle in and some dogs can take months or more to feel at home in a new place. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed things up than impatience ever could.

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Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer who specializes in working with dogs with serious behavioral problems, including aggression. She is the author of five books on canine training and behavior.

photo by colorblindPICASO/Flickr

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Sold 5879 Mercia Lane North Charleston, SC

May joy and peace surround you, Contentment latch your door; And happiness be with you now, And bless you ever more. Congratulations on Your New Home!!

 

May joy and peace surround you, Contentment latch your door; And happiness be with you now, And bless you ever more. Congratulations on Your New Home!!

Posted by Brenda Walker Real Estate Consultant on Tuesday, October 17, 2017

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For Sale 1102 Grove Park Drive Charleston, SC

For Sale CONDO Unit 1102 Grove Park Drive Charleston, SC located in the desired Grand Oaks Plantation Subdivision.

 

 

 

 

 

Great News For The Seller Under Contract 12/17/2017 !!

For Sale a rare downstairs CONDO in Grove Park at Grand Oaks Plantation. Bottom Floor Unit with Many Upgrades!! Absolutely beautiful open floor plan design is great for everyday living. 1,320 square feet 2 bedrooms, 2 full bath unit with hardwood flooring throughout the entire unit and natural light. Master bedroom has a very private feeling with a sitting area perfect for a study. This unit has Crown molding in living area, kitchen and down hallway.

 

For Sale a rare downstairs CONDO in Grove Park at Grand Oaks. Bottom Floor Unit with Many Upgrades!! Absolutely beautiful open floor plan design is great for everyday living. 1,320 square feet 2 bedrooms, 2 full bath unit with hardwood flooring throughout the entire unit and natural light. Master bedroom has a very private feeling with a sitting area perfect for a study. This unit has Crown molding in living area, kitchen and down hallway.

Posted by Brenda Walker Real Estate Consultant on Wednesday, October 18, 2017

 

 

 

 

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10 True Tales of Real Estate Terror

10 True Tales of Real Estate Terror

Practitioners recall the scariest moments they’ve faced in the field.

spooky house at night

Real estate professionals are a brave bunch. You walk into unfamiliar homes every day, prepared to deal with whatever lurks inside. Hopefully, the scariest thing you find is a sellers outdated sense of style. But some properties have more insidious issues that staging cant fix.

No strangers to haunted houses, many practitioners have real-life horror stories of dealing with creepy, ghostly circumstances in the course of their daily work. With Halloween around the corner, REALTOR® Magazine asked its readers to share their most frightening experiences in the field. From paranormal occurrences during showings to apparitions in listing photos, read on … if you dare.

‘It Wanted Me to Leave’

There was an old two-story house in my area that was on the market for a long time—a real fixer-upper in a hot neighborhood. It was eerie: Floors weren’t level, squeaky steps, the works. When I was inside, I felt like someone was watching me, and it wanted me to leave. It was when I noticed a light in the basement that I calmly walked right out … because the house had no electricity. —Monette Chain, Metro First Realty, Oklahoma City

Did You Just Perform an Exorcism?

While showing my client homes one day, we walked into a vacant foreclosure that I thought no one else was showing at the time. There was no car in the driveway and no sign of anyone present. As we opened the front door, two men were coming down the staircase from upstairs—one wearing a long black robe like a priest would and a necklace with a huge cross. He had dark hair and a long, dark beard. The other man, whom Im guessing was his agent, walked behind him. We all cordially greeted one another, and they walked out the back door. We never saw them get into a car or walk down the street. They just seemingly disappeared. My buyer never lets me forget that house and tells everyone that story. —Barbara Mattingly, SFR, Mattingly Real Estate, Upper Marlboro, Md.

Tragedy Amid a Sale

My husband and I took a listing right around the corner from our home in 2013. During the listing period, the 66-year-old seller fell ill and became progressively worse. We helped her as much as we could, taking her to doctors appointments, the pharmacy to pick up her medications, and even to Cedars Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles, which was 40 miles away. Nine months into the listing—the home didnt sell quickly because she was stubbornly holding out for the price she wanted—she told us she was heading up North to visit family. But after the day she was supposed to have returned, I could no longer reach her. Three days passed with no contact, and I finally began calling her family. I received a return call with an ominous message: My client had never shown up for her visit. I went to the sellers house with a colleague and peeked in the front door window. It was a horrible site inside. There were overturned chairs everywhere, and I could see the back door was ajar. We could hear her dog barking. When we went inside, it smelled like death. I found my clients body in the hallway; she had been dead for several days. We called 911, and when the police arrived, they were suspicious of the violent scene, not knowing that the seller had been so ill. They held my colleague and I all day, finally letting us go at 8 p.m. when the coroner arrived. At the time, there was a buyer for the property, and were two weeks into a 30-day escrow period. The buyer, an emergency room nurse whose daily routine involves matters of death, elected to continue with the escrow. The sale closed two weeks later. —Debra Kessler, SRES, Century 21 Troop Real Estate, Simi Valley, Calif.

A Ghostly Purchase Agreement

I have a client whose sister-in-law is a medium. After my client made an offer on a home, I joked that the sister-in-law should come through the house during inspection and make sure there were no spirits lingering. So she did! As she left, she said: I got rid of two, but there is a spirit in the front room that doesnt want to leave. If you buy the house, Ill come back and get rid of him. My client still took the house. —Allyson Valcheff, Keller Williams Realty Centres, Newmarket, Ontario

Nothing Left Behind

As soon as I pulled up the driveway, the hair on the back of my neck stood up. My buyers, a married couple whom I was showing the property to, were standing outside, and there was a feeling—and—odor of death. I had chills and began to shake. When I opened the front door, the wife—who was five months pregnant—felt like she was going into labor. We turned around immediately and left. As soon as we pulled out of the driveway and got about 100 feet away from the house, the wife said she felt better. Later, the listing agent, who was related to the seller, told me no one who visited the property wanted to stay long. Finally, after getting no offers, the seller decided to demolish the property. Three workers were injured one way or another during demolition, so the seller gave the remnants of the home to the volunteer fire department to use for controlled fire training. Three firemen were hurt, though not severely. The house smoldered for three days. Now theres nothing but dead space where the house once stood, and nothing—not even grass—grows there. —Theresa Akin, SFR, Corpus Christi Realty Group, Corpus Christi, Texas

Moving Into Someone Else’s History

Several years ago, while searching the MLS for the perfect home for my client, I came across an intriguing photo of a midcentury dining room buffet in a new listing. I previewed the home and called my client to come see it right away. She didn’t like the buffet, which was bolted to the wall, but she loved the house. During the inspection, we happened to be at the home when an elderly woman knocked on the door. The woman, who lived next door, insisted that her deceased husband still lived in the listing, and, therefore, my client could not purchase it. The buyer, unfazed, completed the purchase. Later, she learned from neighbors on the block that her home’s original owner was an architect who built it and the house next door, which was an exact replica, for his wife. They lived in the separate homes rather than share one together. The elderly woman made several appearances at my client’s front door over the subsequent years, always insisting that her deceased husband was still occupying the home. She told my client that her husband had designed and built the dining room buffet, which was the only piece in the home that was not duplicated in the house next door. Eventually, the elderly woman was moved to a nursing home, and her house was sold. I recently sold my client’s home, and though she disliked the dining room buffet, she kept it through several renovations. The next owner also had lukewarm feelings about the buffet—but it remains in the house. I still can’t explain why that midcentury buffet intrigues me or why the people who have owned the home kept it when they didn’t like it very much. But I have a feeling that buffet will stay in that house for a very long time. —Monika Lenz, Monika Lenz Realty, Ridgecrest, Calif.

Not the Cats Meow

I was previewing a home for out-of-town clients one day. No one was home, so I used the lockbox key to let myself in. After looking at the upstairs bedrooms, I turned to find a giant black cat guarding the stairs. She tried to scratch and bite me every time I tried to go down the stairs. After five or six frightening attempts, I grabbed a sweater from one of the bedrooms and threw it over the cat as I sprinted down the stairs and out the door to safety! —Keith Willingham, Faith Wilson Group, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Open and Shut

A few years ago, I went with a customer to view a foreclosure in which the previous owner had passed away, we were told. When we went inside, we both felt a strong presence, but the house was vacant. As we toured the home, we felt as if someone was watching us. Halfway through, all the exterior doors, which were closed for our safety, started to slightly open and close. There was no power, and, therefore, no AC to make that happen. We looked at each other and said, Nope, this is not the right house for you, and got out of there. I never showed that house to anyone else again. I believe its still vacant to this day. —Sabrina Robles Ocasio, Weichert, REALTORS®, Land & Home, Brooksville, Fla.

A Pictures Worth a Thousand Screams

Im a professional real estate photographer, and I have taken photos of many old homes. When I edit the pictures, I am sometimes shocked by what I see. One time, the reflection of a tree in the window looked like a person wearing a creepy mask. But worse was when a woman was standing behind me while I took a photo in one of the rooms of a listing. In the picture, the reflection in a mirror showed an old man in an overcoat behind me instead. —Raylene Hansen, Raylene Inder Hansen Photography, Providence, R.I.


The actual rattlesnake Lisa Bartlett confronted during a showing.

‘Rattle, Rattle, Rattle’

Back in 2010, I was showing a home to a client while I was five months pregnant, and as I walked up to the front door and put the key in the lock, I heard rattle, rattle, rattle. I looked down and saw a young rattlesnake at my toes. Apparently, he had been curled up under the door jamb, and I didnt see him. Now he was fully awake and quite annoyed at the disruption. I yelled to my client to stay back, and then I pushed off the door, jumping back as fast as I could. I felt the snake hit my leg, but miraculously, he didnt break the skin. I still dont know how I wasnt bitten, but I thanked the man above for saving me and my baby. —Lisa Bartlett, RE/MAX Desert Showcase, Peoria, Ariz.

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